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20121225
20121225
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CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am EST
. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was wha
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:45pm EST
recognize a few special guests we have with us. i would like to begin with a welcome to one of our members of board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california pete wilson. governor. [applause] [applause] our county supervisor peter floyd. peter, thank you for coming. [applause] now for those of who who were patient enough to go through the book signing line prior to the event this evening we yo know the wonderful woman is here with us tonight. she's "the new york times" best selling officer and president of gingrich productions. please join me in recognizing calista fig h -- gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a special guest. if i i know if i were simply to give the typical dinner circuit gingrich the one where you list every accomplishment of the speaker's bio. i promise you we would be here all night and newt would get bored. the list of achievements in politics, his involvement in life-long learning, his expertise of national security matters, his best interest, the philanthropy endeavors. the box he's written, the list goes on and on. let's presume we are
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:00am EST
league. i hadn't even reported us to look at. he pulled the pin out from the grill cover the toasters smoking and blackened on one side. is my comic fare or did they steal it? [laughter] i don't know, the police didn't mention your comment. my father put peanut butter in the brain scientists can replace distressing count with a coat over his pajamas, put on a pair of shoes and walk down the lane to get there. we walked perhaps five minutes down the narrow lane, which ran through fields on each side when a police car came up behind us had slowed and the driver greeted my father by name. i hit my piece of her toast behind my back on my father talked to the police man. i wish my family would pay normal come the slice, white bread, the kind that went into toasters like every other family i knew. my father had found a local baker shop come within the exclusive heather brown bread he insisted on buying them. he said they tasted better, which was to my mind nonsense. proper bread was white and please placed in tasted like almost nothing. [laughter] that was the point. the driver of the polic
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 3:15pm EST
a reception outside we invite you to join us. hope you'll buy the book and have the autograph it. thank you on much to you and to our commentators. heart mark >> historical novelist said to focus on five families, american, english, german, russian and welsh as they traverse the political landscape with the second world war. this is just over an hour. >> thank you and good evening. you and i have never met until 10 minutes ago, but i have to say i feel as if i know you after so many years of reading your terrific books. you've given me and most of the people here tonight tremendous pleasure. as i think one critic from your book said being able to get lost in a wonderful story and come out days or weeks later feeling as if you've learned something. so you do both things i appreciate what you do so much. to make something like an historical trilogy. that is tiny little pieces. i learned on the cbs and is issued to journalism. is that true? >> is close to the truth, yes. my first job was university reporter in the south with echo, which is my hometown newspaper. and it worked for th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:30am EST
university of chicago before he took the shot of a couple years ago. >> is it coincidental uses direct consignment was that on purpose? >> he has a personal passion for the school because of his family connections. >> i can come in the american university, or who runs the? >> faculty air missile easterners. the vast majority of students. >> is it associated with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and reverend bliss this day. >> i don't thought that either come over 10 and open a store not offspring and delete, but to people of all ethnicities, classes and that's its appeal, it's mary. >> how is it viewed in the middle east and how is it the reverend bliss opened it? >> all-star with the chronologically earlier one first. there's a lot of suspicion when the school opened in the 1860s. this is run by christian missionaries, americans who didn't have very deep roots in the region, but rather quickly it became apparent to middle easterners who are not just orthodox christian
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 1:45pm EST
earthquake in haiti. >> well now, joining us here on our booktv set is edwidge ys is danticat, who is an author, and t most recent book is "so spokes the earth: the haiti i know, the haiti i wantto know." edwidge danticat come in thhaiti january 2010, where were you? >> on january 2010 i was here in miami. i was in a supermarket with myus daughter when someone called me and said that there had been and earthquake in haiti. rthquake in. of course, so many lives were changed on. i lost so many family and friends in and the country lost something like 200,000 people. >> host: when was your first visit down to haiti? >> i had a very little bit at that time. i went to see some family and friends and see how they were doing. >> host: so you got to haiti three weeks after the earthquake. what was it like when you got their. >> guest: it was difficult to see all that disruption, to see all the suffering of people were going through. but nothing like it was working actually living there at that time. you know, at that moment, there is something like 10 million and have people living like th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
saying that it is. tell us what how they locked horns other this. >> well, it would have to be one of the oldest debate thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reas
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
story most of us enjoy most. so when i am reading for fun i like to read ashley trollope, elizabeth gaskell, as well as well-known ones like jane austen and dickens and george areas. the american writer i like very much from that period or a little later is edith walton. great favorite of mine. i like her because she is the real storyteller but always kind of fiercely intelligent. her analysis of her characters always amaze you but that isn't all. she doesn't just do that, she tells you a real story. she is a great favorite of mine. >> before i turn this back over -- i want to ask a personal favor of you and ask you to sign this book. [applause] >> by the way -- you will have a chance to do the same. >> while they are signing i want to introduce myself, dale gregory, vice president of public programs and how thrilling it is to have you all here in these two charming gentlemen, i am sure you will agree and i want to remind you the book is on sale in the museum store, book signing will be out the back doors, i am so happy that you came, that that you said yes, we want to thank you, ch
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atomic river above and below the n. no one in civilian authority, not even lincoln, had any detailed knowledge of the plans being prepared by the union's top general, george p. mcclellan. he was in secrecy assisted by a small clique of generals who shared his views of lincoln's policies. they were opposed. worse, mcclellan was rumored to be dying. with his plans die with him? under thes
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
fellow at a e. i. and we are pleased to have you with us to consider this fateful history and its role in american politicized housing finance. after many years of dealing with and thinking about fannie mae i thought i knew a lot about this subject but i learned a lot more about it from reading bob's book, especially the very long-term evolution of politicized mortgage finance in this country and also about the vivid personalities involved over the last 40 years, all the way to the end of the story, at least it is the end so far. the book is full of information but in addition if you read my invitation to this event you know i think it represents an underlying tragic drama. in fact a shakespearean tragedy in five's. rise, power, hubris, fall, and other humiliation. on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was the center of, quote, of the best housing finance system in the world. so i
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
absolutely fascinating. a good word to use if you don't know if a felon or a hero was fascinating is that it wants to do a biography. by that a year later, i saw jean kennedy smith again. she approached me and wanted me to do it, to write that biography. they recognize there is a need for such a biography. i said well, i'm in the mid-of writing another book by andrew carnegie. she said when he went to to be finished? you can't say no to a kennedy. i said i don't know, six months maybe. six months to the day, we got a call at home from someone i was convinced was a ted kennedy impersonator. i don't know if nav corp. in new york or listen to don imus. he had a ted kennedy impersonator and sounded just like this. so i listened to the message and after listening to it the second and third time, i realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in sessio
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
>> you don't know us investigating reporting. the point we've seen over the years is not just economics. it's was caused administering because it's troublesome. ..'s watch live sunday january 6th at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> coming up booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we interview authors. acclaimed inventor ray kurzweil and his latest book, how to create a mind:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engi
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
conversation shifted. these terms are precise or scientific, but it's still useful constructs for thinking about what changed in 1962. environmentalism is different in several important ways. it's a little more pessimistic, not nearly as forward-looking and are much more immediate, urgent and dyer and with the evolution of environmental thinking, we begin to focus more and more on ourselves come over before the species of concern may be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
colonies, and let us worry about everything else. so it's kind of a new world flow, not exactly new world order but a new nazi order inqdf europe are.qesgqdcq >> so, brooke stoddard, yousrçzz fleet.sd the french who ended up getting control ofj the french fleet? >> it's interesting, because hitler understood this fear that the british had, just as well as the british did, that the french navy was a very, very important piece of the global situation. and he wanted france to drop out of the war their key didn't want them to continue fighting. he didn't want the french ships to keep attacking them. so he made the terms with the french strong terms, but he also allowed some negotiation or terms that they would accept. he thought if he made them too strong, too strict, they would say forget it, we're going to keep fighting. but the term for the french navy was this, the agreement said that the friendships would remain neutral under the supervision of the germans and the italians. and the french could use certain vessels for coastal defense, something like that. but to the french, that w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
required me to read material and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around the world have taken months or even years. the speed of my sailing ship would have -- it was the invention of steam power but the creation of regimented european empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
communicate meaning to us. so let me say a few things. i will volunteer a few of my observations about what is striking about this photograph. one of them is the beauty of the subjects term is not just talking about the americas, which are gorgeous. and talking about the energy. there's a beautiful energy. there's the light. the humor. the lighting is not perfect, but the woman in the red, but with the way flowers is turned to her left in the look of what can only be described as gleeful amusement. obviously something very funny headset in this photo was snapped in this group of women. delay, humor, playfulness and the interactions of the screw. this is unusual. but we are accustomed to seeing his images in dreariness, bleakness, depictions that on the surface communicate injustice. if you are familiar, toyota to miyake's photograph of three boys advance in our stand to end looking wistfully across a barbed wire fence come a black-and-white image. that's the classic image of japanese-american incarceration. this is something quite different. notice the contrast between the beauty of the sub
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
-confidence to go had been upon us was telling them they're wrong. but they had the extraordinary level of intellectually ability required to acknowledge the possibility that they were wrong in a profound sense. what is the evidence that would prove i'm wrong? so when they were wrong, because zoonosis rate of the time, they could change course as lincoln did many times during the civil war. >> host: that's a rare combination. >> guest: these are characteristics captured. >> host: we are wrapping it up quickly. we just had a presidential election. the winner he was president already so he's been filtered for four years, but mitt romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was,
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
the iraqi forces that were accompanying us. it was a very poignant moment, shot in the head, the battalion commander was right next to me. five minute before that, said who are you? i am a combat historian and i'm here to gather your story. i have written several books on world war ii. interestingly enough he said any, a colonel of the battalion, he said my father was the pilot in world war ii who fought on the eastern front. we had this immediate reports and within five minute for engage in combat. what was so striking and interesting is this young marine was killed, he said gentlemen, i want to see a symphony fire. quoted general patton that day, every one of us including me, a civilian arm with an m-16 because i wanted to survive, fired down the block, we suppressed those people. several years later we came back, i was given the honor of taking the fifth marines which he led to normandy and we toward the normandy battlefields with the men i was in full. away, and went to pointe du hoc which is the subject of this book "dog company" which i'm going to talk about. the book i tal
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:30am EST
finalist. thank you for joining us o
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00am EST
prove to be more deadly than that iron curtain of which we speak so much. baldwin used a refrain about distancing between whites and blacks, between whites and of themselves, and between the stories within which people claim to be living. as the celebratory marches arrived in the center of montgomery, baldwin noticed that the confederate flag was flying from the capitol dome, and that the federalize alabama national guard ordered to protect the marchers, as he put it, ward little confederate flags on their jackets. on all along the road, rogue baldwin, quoting him, older black men and women would undo -- into her unspeakable repression. and the white section of town, baldwin saw businessmen, as he puts it, on balconies, jeering, their mates in backdoors standing silent. and he describes, quote beige colored woman standing on the streets, a bit nervous who suddenly steps off the curb and joins them. a small american flag in his hand, baldwin marched next to harry belafonte, who had also happens to be a u.s. navy veteran of world war ii, white secretaries an upstairs office windows
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00am EST
and his retirement. it's a little over an hour. t to introduce you now, joining us live is steven carter, and he is the author among many other books of this one, his most recent, "the impeachment of abraham lincoln: a novel." professor carter, what are -- there are two premises in here that i want to get to that are historically inaccurate. number one, abraham lincoln survives the assassination attempt and abraham lincoln is impeached. where did you come up with this? >> guest: i'll start by making clear in spite of the title, i'm a lincoln fan. this is not an argument on behalf of lincoln's impeachment, not a brief, but just a novel. as a lincoln fan and interested in power and history, it's a question that suggested itself. what if lincoln had survived, and what if, and my telling of political enemies, and he had many, including had his own party, 1865, they were looking for a way to get him out of the way, what if they tried to do the impeachment process? i built a courtroom drama/murder mystery around that. >> host: when did it occur to you it's a fun thing to do? >> guest: i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:00am EST
know, they come with us. we know about the alcohol in earnest hemingway's life, and how extensive was it, paul, and what about depression? was that a factor in the life as well? >> what? >> depression. >> oh, there's no question that hemingway suffered from what we recognize today as manic depression, bipolarrism. there was alcoholism. i think if he was alive today he might be medicated to prevent some of these things and possibly his suicide which raises a very thorny question. would he have written as brilliantly as he did if he was not suffering so much? that's a hard, hard question that too many artists have to face up to. >> paul, long time reporter for the washington post, what other topics have you written about as an author of books? >> i wrote about robert mack that mar, a name in this city, architect of vietnam, that book published in 1996 called "the living and the dead," and i wrote a book called "sons of mississippi," the book previous to this, a study of the civil rights south and integration of james meredith at the university of ol miss. i like to pick out subjects tha
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22